By Savannah Smith   |  11-23-2016   News
Photo credit: The Goldwater

So many reasons trigger their happiness these days.

Gun rights activists are not only celebrating the victory of President-Elect Donald Trump which they feel would also secure further their rights to own and bear arms, but are also jubilating on what they think are their proven political clout in the election results.

Just before the election, many of these gun owners and rights activists stocked up on their guns and ammunition, worried of a crackdown should Hillary Clinton win since it's widely believed that she supports gun control and in repealing the Second Amendment, which protects Americans' right to beat arms.

Gun rights activists groups and other advocates played an active role in the campaign, supporting candidates they believe are partial to their cause.

The National Rifle Association for one spent $50.2 million in seven races this year by supporting Trump and six Republican Senate candidates. It only lost one race in Nevada.

Alice Tripp, legislative director of the Texas State Rifle Association, the state affiliate of the National Rifle Association told The New York Times that prior to the election they have been threatened and bullied. And that they have been ridiculed for the past 8 years, the total of Obama's presidential years. Now with the triumph of Trump, Tripp expects the tone of the government policy to change. She feels that such a change of policy tone would be good for them.

Gun rights advocates celebrate the loss of Clinton as a sign that gun control is an untouchable issue as they also look forward to a promising further expansion of gun rights under Trump's administration and a Republican majority Congress.

One of the positive developments for their cause gun rights advocates are looking forward to is Trump's support for banning so-called gun free-zones in military bases. The issue acquired fresh attention and renewed importance after shootings at military sites, including at Fort Hood, Texas and in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Trump also supports the move for a national reciprocity that would allow those with concealed-handgun permits in one state to have their permits honored in the other 49 states.

There is also a growing lobby to have silencers easier and less expensive to buy by removing them from the National Firearms Act.

Dudley Brown, the President for National Association for Gun Rights, is urging Republican majorities in both the executive and legislative branches to push for broad deregulation of firearms.

Trump has always been vocal about his support for gun rights saying that government has no business dictating what types of firearms good, honest people are allowed to own.

Gun rights activists feel vindicated with this election, emboldened and encouraged that they have sent an ally to the White House.

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