NASA Says Massive Explosion On Moon Due To Meteor Strike

By Red Pill, The Goldwater · 07-08-2017
Photo credit: Tea Partiest | Youtube.com

An meteor flying through space with the combustible power of ten cruise missiles has just struck the Moon, sparking what scientists say is a massive explosion visible with the naked eye.

The meteor allegedly hit the moon in a 56,000 mph collision and was captured on film by NASA scientists who hoped to highlight the catastrophic danger that the planet Earth faces if a similar meteor were to hit civilization.

Despite the meteor’s tiny proportions which was size of a small boulder at around 88 lbs and weight of a ten year old child, the impact zone damage was colossal and the explosion was comparable visibly to the brightness of a magnitude 4 star.

NASA claims a similar strike at the same speeds from a tiny object against a city on Earth would create a crater about 65 feet deep. Not only would the impact be devastating but the kill zone equivalent to ten Tomahawk cruise missile a target in exactly the same place.

NASA posted that, “For the past eight years NASA has been monitoring the Moon for signs of explosions caused by meteors. However our scientists have just seen the biggest explosion in the history of the program.”

NASA is heavily concerned about the possibility of an asteroid strike being able to end all life on Earth. Which is why it has started the first design phase of a spacecraft known as the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) which will be used to redirect an asteroid’s path.

NASA is daily operating in conjunction with the European Space Agency (ESA) on the new craft and their hopes are to have the first space tests underway by 2022 where it will attempt to move a “non-threatening” asteroid.

Source:

http://www.express.co.uk/news/science/825642/Moon-meteor-biggest-explosion-NASA-video-impact

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>1 meteor

>4 magnitude star

>88 lbs

What did they mean by this?

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