By: Savannah Smith | 08-11-2018 | News
Photo credit: Twitter | @TumaresTarifa

Grieving Orca Finally Lets Go of Her Dead Calf After Carrying It For 17 Days

The Southern Resident orca who caught national attention for carrying the corpse of her calf for at least 17 days has finally learned the painful art of letting go. After weeks of mourning, the orca has released her beloved calf.

The ordeal of carrying her dead calf is over and now the previously grieving mother looks “vigorous and healthy.”’

Ken Balcomb, executive director of the Center for Whale Research, spotted orca J35 with her pod off San Juan Island on Saturday. He said J35 even frolicked past his window.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Southern Resident orca J35 who carried the body of her dead calf for at least 17 days /1,000 miles has finally let go. Let&#39;s hope the exposure this sad situation has been given helps the plight of the Southern Resident Killer Whale population Image: CWR <a href="https://t.co/ZkbQidKatg">pic.twitter.com/ZkbQidKatg</a></p>&mdash; Marine Connection (@MC_org) <a href="https://twitter.com/MC_org/status/1028541078121730048?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Tahlequah, or J35, the orca mother who captured the world&#39;s heart carrying her dead calf for at least 17 days and more than 1,000 miles is no longer carrying the calf. She looks strong and well, and was swimming with her family of southern resident killer whales.</p>&mdash; Lynda V. Mapes (@LyndaVMapes) <a href="https://twitter.com/LyndaVMapes/status/1028486141765283840?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Researchers had been worrying about J35 fearing that the she was not eating properly and exerting too much energy pushing the corpse of her dead offspring. She was last spotted with her dead calf Wednesday.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">The orca known as J35 still hasn&#39;t let go of her newborn calf&#39;s body more than two weeks after her baby died. <a href="https://t.co/xXlsMYEzQ5">https://t.co/xXlsMYEzQ5</a></p>&mdash; TorontoStar (@TorontoStar) <a href="https://twitter.com/TorontoStar/status/1027797956399910917?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 10, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Intervention was ruled out as NOAA wildlife biologists said the idea of separating the pair was never considered.

J35, a 20-year-old orca, carried her calf more than 1,000 miles. Whale experts say it’s not unusual for orcas to mourn their offspring. They have seen it before. But J35 clung to her calf for an unusually long period of time.

Many have expressed sympathy and concern for J35, with artists even creating their own interpretation of the unusual yet poignant development hoping to call more attention to the endangered orca.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Lori Christopher is an artist from Hat Island near <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SeattleWA?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#SeattleWA</a> and she has done a watercolour of grieving <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/J35?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#J35</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/yyj?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#yyj</a> What is your reaction to this unfolding situation with endangered <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/orca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#orca</a> <a href="https://t.co/J61P5NtO9P">pic.twitter.com/J61P5NtO9P</a></p>&mdash; CBContheisland (@CBContheisland) <a href="https://twitter.com/CBContheisland/status/1025451476519477248?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 3, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Others thought that J35 has a “message” for us, humans, by carrying her dead calf that long.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I&#39;m starting to feel like she&#39;s doing it on purpose. Like she&#39;s telling us we did this. Polluting and warming their water, eating all their food, altering the ecosystem in known &amp; unknown ways with toxic and nuclear waste. Where does it end?</p>&mdash; Angel (@AngelT253) <a href="https://twitter.com/AngelT253/status/1027601581812920320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 9, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Heartbreaking</p>&mdash; amy anderson (@amieblueeyes) <a href="https://twitter.com/amieblueeyes/status/1027345073485348865?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 9, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Researchers have also been tending to ailing orca J50, a 3½-year-old whale who has lost 20 percent of her body mass and developed a depression near the base of her skull. Crews had to inject J50 with antibiotics on Thursday.

Balcomb also spotted J50 with her mother and brother on Saturday, along with NOAA researchers who were following her to collect prey remains and feces.

Those who have been closely monitoring through news the development to the J35 saga expressed joy and relief that she finally let go of her calf.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">What a beautiful mother you are Tahlequah to grieve the loss of your calf while allowing we undeserving humans to share in your heartbreak. Rest in peace little one.</p>&mdash; kim (@kimww22) <a href="https://twitter.com/kimww22/status/1028551773273972736?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank goodness. Now she can heal and thrive.</p>&mdash; Kathy Anderson (@Kathy4673) <a href="https://twitter.com/Kathy4673/status/1028533597471420417?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I feel sad and relieved at the same time. Poor Tahlequah. I hope this population gets the help it needs and she can have healthy surviving babies soon.</p>&mdash; kittymadgrrrr (@kittymadgrrrr) <a href="https://twitter.com/kittymadgrrrr/status/1028493309788938240?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I’m crying…….goodbye sweet one.</p>&mdash; Cathy Carrier (@ccscout) <a href="https://twitter.com/ccscout/status/1028505401086554117?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Source:

https://www.khou.com/article/news/local/grieving-orca-lets-go-of-dead-calf-after-carrying-it-over-2-weeks/281-583058204

Twitter: #MAGA #KeepAmericaGreat! #Orca #J35 #OrcaFinallyLetGoOfDeadCalf #Whale #Wildlife

Share this article
Thoughts on the above story? Comment below!
2 Comment/s
anone No. 33729 2018-08-12 : 10:48

17 days what a coinsidence, the other one got meds so far doing bit better.

Anonymous No. 33813 2018-08-13 : 08:15

17=Q

What do you think about this article?
Name
Comment *
Image

Recent News

Popular Stories