By Steve Dellar   |  07-13-2018   News
Photo credit: Twitter | @SomosTodosBolsonaro

Reuters Magazine ‘Foreign Affairs’ (as well the UK’s Financial Times) headlines this week what thegoldwater.com reported 3.5 months ago already, but what most then saw as a fluke.

The candidate for the far-right, Mr Jair Bolsonaro is still leading the polls of South America’s biggest nation with now only 3 months to go till voters head to the polls. Many are starting to seriously consider Mr Bolsonaro might have a chance.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Leading presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro says there is no racism in Brazil; even denounced by Attorney General, is it possible that he is not racist? <a href="https://t.co/a9jnAk7xic">https://t.co/a9jnAk7xic</a> <a href="https://t.co/RGwuexmksS">pic.twitter.com/RGwuexmksS</a></p>&mdash; BlackWomenofBrazil (@BWofBrazil) <a href="https://twitter.com/BWofBrazil/status/1017464814728294400?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

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Mr Bolsonaro’s growth in popularity has been impressive and steady. Using social media and the general disgust of the Brazilians with today’s political class, he has seen his poll numbers rise from five percent in July 2016 to around 20 percent today.

Related coverage: https://thegoldwater.com/news/25024-Brazil-Far-Right-Candidate-Leads-Presidential-Election-Polls

Whereas most experts agreed in the spring of 2018 that his lead in the polls was a probable fluke due to his record which favors radical positions on various social topics and his history as an apologist for military dictatorship and torture, young people in Brazil seem more and more convinced that the only way to deal with the growing problem of criminality in corruption in the biggest South American country would be some form of return to a military style dictatorship as they’ve had in the 1970s and 1980s.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Is <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Brazil?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Brazil</a> facing another military <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Coup?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Coup</a>? Society&#39;s polarization spikes <a href="https://t.co/tFXrdCWyy6">https://t.co/tFXrdCWyy6</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Bolsonaro?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Bolsonaro</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Dictatorship?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Dictatorship</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Lula?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Lula</a> <a href="https://t.co/6cupLMCzTr">pic.twitter.com/6cupLMCzTr</a></p>&mdash; Fort Russ News (@FortRussNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/FortRussNews/status/1017529838020845570?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

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Under a guise of ‘it can’t get worse so why not try it’, a growing group of youngsters decides to go for something new and Mr Bolsonaro has softened his image a bit in recent weeks, making him even more likable to his probable voters.

Many in the political and business classes of Brazil now admit that he could be a possible dark-horse candidate, some sort of populist outsider whose anti-establishment rhetoric could deliver a victory in October.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Only a few years ago, the rise of a presidential candidate such as Bolsonaro would have been unthinkable. <a href="https://t.co/k8NnJ1wTKv">https://t.co/k8NnJ1wTKv</a></p>&mdash; Foreign Affairs (@ForeignAffairs) <a href="https://twitter.com/ForeignAffairs/status/1017649891747737600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 13, 2018</a></blockquote>

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Ms Lyudmila Okuneva, professor at the University of International Relations in Moscow interviewed for BRICS magazine, explained that the current political class in Brazil is “afraid of Bolsonaro, because the ‘injection’ of the military regime was more than strong after the military spent 21 years in power.”.

According to professor Okuneva, the reason for his lead is because ever since the multiple corruption scandals of the past presidents, there is no single candidate of the center.

Source:

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/brazil/2018-07-12/will-brazils-next-president-be-far-right-nationalist

Twitter: #Godisawoman #CriticalRole #MAGA #Scottie #IsaiahThomas #QAnon
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Anonymous No. 31144 1531495571
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