By Kyle James   |  05-18-2018   News
Photo credit: @WhiteHouse | Twitter

A sound clip has people debating which word they are actually hearing: Laurel or Yanny? Some people who listen to the audio clip swear they hear the voice say "Yanny." Others listen to the audio and say they hear "Laurel" while others report hearing both or even different words altogether. The White House staff made a video with their own reactions to hearing the recording. Stick around to the very end to find out what Trump hears.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">What do you hear?! Yanny or Laurel <a href="https://t.co/jvHhCbMc8I">pic.twitter.com/jvHhCbMc8I</a></p>&mdash; Cloe Feldman (@CloeCouture) <a href="https://twitter.com/CloeCouture/status/996218489831473152?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 15, 2018</a></blockquote>

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The debate over which word is spoken in the clip started after Reddit user Roland Camry posted it last Monday. The 20-year-old Instagram personality Cloe Feldman tweeted it, and it took off from there. It gained airtime on most major and local media outlets and was shared in thousands of groups.

Some users speculated it could have to do with the age or the frequencies people can hear. It has even stirred up some heated arguments which have turned into a large-scale uproar.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Yanny vs. Laurel is starting some real fights</p>&mdash; JJ Watt (@JJWatt) <a href="https://twitter.com/JJWatt/status/996495345734574080?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 15, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">im sorry but its YANNY …. if u think its laurel im praying for u</p>&mdash; ellise (@ellise) <a href="https://twitter.com/ellise/status/996713315257626624?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 16, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It&#39;s 100% Laurel …please unfollow if you hear Yanny</p>&mdash; Danny Kanell (@dannykanell) <a href="https://twitter.com/dannykanell/status/996710549101694977?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 16, 2018</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Team “at first I could only hear Yanny, then I listened closely a bunch of times and could hear both at different frequencies but now I can only hear Laurel” for life.</p>&mdash; Sammy Paul (@ICOEPR) <a href="https://twitter.com/ICOEPR/status/996691845513187329?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 16, 2018</a></blockquote>

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The debate is reminiscent of a debate in 2015 over whether the color of a dress was blue or gold. A professor of speech and language named Brad Story at The University of Arizona explained the phenomenon by saying part of the reason people hear different words is the low quality of the audio file which allows for ambiguity.

"When I analyzed the recording of Laurel, that third resonance is very high for the L. It drops for the R and then it rises again for the L," Story said. "The interesting thing about the word Yanny is that the second frequency that our vocal track produces follows almost the same path, in terms of what it looks like spectrographically, as Laurel. If you have a low quality of the recording, it's not surprising some people would confuse the second and third resonances flipped around, and hear Yanny instead of Laurel."

Story added that if you change the pitch of the original recording, it is possible to hear both words.

The White House released the following video:

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="und" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Laurel?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Laurel</a>? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Yanny?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Yanny</a>? Or… <a href="https://t.co/5hth07SdGY">pic.twitter.com/5hth07SdGY</a></p>&mdash; The White House (@WhiteHouse) <a href="https://twitter.com/WhiteHouse/status/997255568782852096?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 17, 2018</a></blockquote>

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Source: http://www.kxan.com/news/national-news/yanny-or-laurel-audio-file-has-people-hearing-two-different-words/1182366743

Twitter: #Yanny #Laurel #TeamYanny #TeamLaurel #Meme #Science #Phenomena
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Thoughts on the above story? Comment below!
5 Comment/s


Anonymous No. 26404 1526632930

Yanny

Anonymous No. 26405 1526633043

Yeah, I'm a Yanny as well. listened to all the other altered recordings and it's always Yanny. Do we need to get an army together or something? Those other folks seem like they are gunning for us.

Anonymous No. 26426 1526650493

Laurel here on both my pc and ipad. cannot even get close to yanny trying.

Anonymous No. 26427 1526651383

I hear Laurel in the first recording at the top. I hear Yanny in the White House 's video.

Anonymous No. 26430 1526654296

I was hearing Laurel last night and this AM but now it changed and all I hear is yanny. Odd!!!!

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