By Steve Dellar  |  05-04-2018   News
Photo credit: Candybox Images | Dreamstime.com

Students in Germany this week were given an English language exam for their Abitur test, a qualification which allows them to get to university entrance. However, many of them were upset by what they had to discuss to prove they were worthy of an English aptitude proof.

The reason lies behind the subject of their discussion. For their exam question, they were handed a drawing by Indian cartoonist Paresh Nath which was published in the Khaleej Times in April 2016. It discusses the different views Europeans have about Brexit, pro and contra. As you can imagine, this is not the subject that interests most 17 and 18-year-olds, and thus many of them failed to write much down.

The cartoon shows two different sides of the same Brexit story. One is called Project Fantasy, and it shows a British man with a Bowler hat and a British Empire union jack flag in the sky. Very grandiose, very nationalistic. The other shows Project Reality, showing the same British man alone on a small island encircled by four large sharks, symbolising “chaos,” “trade issues,” “economic uncertainties” and “job confusion.”

Mr Paresh Nath, who drew the cartoon, explains: “As a postgraduate in English and American literature, I have an affinity for British and European culture and liberal viewpoints. I weighed up the pros and cons of Brexit and spread the message through my cartoon to the public.”

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">The Reality of Brexit Is Far from the Dream Britain Envisioned <a href="https://t.co/an76YUrpDw">https://t.co/an76YUrpDw</a> by Paresh Nath <a href="https://t.co/MvhpN6pwZH">pic.twitter.com/MvhpN6pwZH</a></p>&mdash; Institutional Investor (@iimag) <a href="https://twitter.com/iimag/status/752555823096819712?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 11, 2016</a></blockquote>

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For anyone apt with the news and the current situation of ongoing Brexit negotiations, this would be an easy task. For a German 17-year-old interested in things like the latest single by Dua Lipa, affordable fashion or the Bundesliga, an impossible one.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Brexit Domino effect<br><br>by Paresh Nath, The Khaleej Times, UAE <a href="https://t.co/OKiFOzmlJm">pic.twitter.com/OKiFOzmlJm</a></p>&mdash; ⚔News Now (@juergen_p) <a href="https://twitter.com/juergen_p/status/746775553596862464?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 25, 2016</a></blockquote>

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And thus, a group of students started an online petition to get better, more relevant questions asked during these exam sessions, questions they can answer and are interested in. In a week’s time, 35,000 have joined online.

Source:

https://www.schwarzwaelder-bote.de/inhalt.rottweil-wir-sitzen-lange-auf-heissen-kohlen.59ad80d6-0b8e-4e1f-9936-8baea3d87e0d.html

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4 Comment/s


RaDonna Marshall No. 25052 1525460374

Typical of global influence. This is not a question for non-voters, but you see the strategy of making the youth 'hate' Brexit.

All the more reason to keep Brexit.

Anonymous No. 25058 1525464292

Warnimg! F;oold detected; podt dicarded.

…do there is a blackout on SOROS!

Anonymous No. 25059 1525464506

Clear the germans want to influence their youth when it comes to Brexit. A 2016 cartoon is inserted into an exam everyone has to take who turns 18.

S. Laxmi No. 25218 1525615937

Nice article.

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