By Kyle James  |  03-21-2018   News
Photo credit: @Interestinate | Facebook

There's a small group of daredevils who climb giant towers to change a light bulb and if you are afraid of heights this job isn't for you. Some transmission towers include airplane warning lights to warn aircraft of the potential danger and avoid unwanted collisions but the light bulbs eventually burn out.

These towers can stretch up to 2,000 feet into the sky and there is no way to change a light bulb when it goes out other than the old-fashioned method of screwing it in by hand. A YouTube channel reported a climber in a viral video gets $20,000 to climb a 1,500-foot tower and change the giant light bulb every six months.

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His heart-pounding climb was captured on video with the help of a drone winning an award at the New York City Drone Film Festival in 2016. Schmidt is part of a select few that have the skill and ability to make such a climb in the first place. Some transmission towers stretch over <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVsHx-PQ4rI">2,000 feet high such as this one.</a>

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It's not easy to become a tower climber. At heights over 1,000 feet, winds can be as strong as 60 mph and the temperature can drop to below zero. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, transmission tower climbers can earn anywhere from $35,000 to $50,000 a year with the national average hourly rate being $21.27 per hour.

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A training video for a tower climbing company describes the process of climbing a tower, some climbers even climb without ropes which can drain less energy from the climber and speed up the ascent.

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The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated there are 9,900 tower climbers employed as of 2010 and say they expect that number increase to 13,000 by 2020.

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Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhIBFeJU2us

Twitter: #Transmission #Tower #Climber #2000Feet #HighClimb
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3 Comment/s


Anonymous No. 21066 1521611725

Nope. NOPE NOPE!

Anonymous No. 21076 1521625545

Not to put them out of business but!!!!

Why can just run a large core diameter Shielded Fiber optic Cable the length of the tower up the center with a Light diffuser at the top, attach an 1000+ watt LED/Laser at the base sending Light Pluses from the Base to the top of the Mass to the diffuser. Using the Fiberoptic cable as a “light guide”?

Anonymous No. 21083 1521630207

@21076 interesting idea. Does seem like it could work

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