By Earnest Jones  |  03-10-2017   News
Photo credit: The Goldwater

Julian Assange has just made a shocking revelation on the anti-virus programs available in the market. Speaking on the CIA Vault7 Press conference, the WikiLeaks founder just said that the virus checking programs contain the CIA Virus that aid the agency to exploit computers. Assange’s revelation is supported by the 8,000 pages of purported CIA hacking data that it released on Tuesday.

Peppering through the data reveals that hackers are quoted to be taking potshots at anti-virus firms, this suggests that the American Intelligence agencies are keenly aware of the flaws in the products meant to be keeping us all safe online.

Assange’s revelation is enough to draw a firm conclusion on this subtle issue on the unreliability of the products available in the market. This also shows that America’s top cyberspies are not always flattering about commonly used security software.

COMODO is the self-proclaimed global leader in the cyber security solutions realm. The CIA appears to give the brand mixed praise, a post by one of the CIA hackers says that Comodo is a colossal pain in the posterior, adding that it literally catches everything until you let it not to.

The hacker also says that the Comodo 6 doesn’t catch nearly as much stuff as he describes a particularly glaring vulnerability as a gaping hole of doom.

Comodo’s Chief Executive, Melih Abdulhayoglu emphasized the first part of the post saying that being called a pain by the CIA was a badge of honor that the brand is proud of, adding that the vulnerability described by the CIA was obsolete. Comodo 6 was unleashed in 2013.

Kaspersky Lab is one of the leading providers of security protection. However, it may not keep you safe from the CIA. A flaw in the code enables the CIA to bypass Kaspersky’s protections. However, a comment from the founder dismissed the allegation saying that the flaw identified in the CIA leak was fixed a year ago.

A statement from a CIA hacker says that its easy to evade the German-engineered AVIRA. The firm made a statement saying that it had fixe what it described as a minor vulnerability within few hours of the WikiLeaks release, adding that there is no evidence that any of its users had been affected by the bug.

The CIA devised a trick to defeat AVG. The Chief Technology Officer for AVG’s owner said that the CIA appeared to be discussing a theoretical bypass of AVG’s scanning engine which could have required additional work to successfully deploy as malicious software, adding that the issue is not critical.

One of the CIA hackers said that F-SECURE is a lower tier product that causes minimal difficulty. The CIA hackers seemed to experience difficulty using BITDEFENDER. However, one of the hackers said that they could hack it by a bit of tinkering. Bitdefender representative Marius Buterchi said the only conclusion to draw was that "we are detecting the CIA tools."

WikiLeaks' release: https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/

Share this article


On The Goldwater you can comment anonymously, meaning you can post freely without being tracked or monitored. Your Identity is hidden from others.
1 Comment/s


Bruce Quaintance No. 1699 1489191823

Interesting article, but you badly need an editor to check these people's writing. Hard to read with jarring misspellings and syntax errors.

What do you think about this article?
Name
Email
Subject
Comment *
File