By Savannah Smith  |  02-27-2017   News
Photo credit: Brian Taylor | Flickr

British Prime Minister Theresa May promised a ' hard Brexit' and she appears firm and determined to deliver on such pledge, protecting first and foremost the interest of the U.K. The tough leader is reportedly expected to announce soon that European Union (EU) citizens arriving in U.K. after a cut-off date to be pegged at March 15 would no longer be entitled to live permanently in the U.K. Such move is seen as a good measure to prevent practically "half of Romania and Bulgaria" from coming to the U.K. before Brexit.

In order to effectively carry out such preemptive move against the potential influx of citizens from other EU countries, Theresa May is said to be contemplating on ending rights given to EU nationals under the freedom of movement rules when she triggers Article 50 next week to formally start the Brexit process. Should such a plan push through, it is unclear whether May's measure would constitute a breach of EU treaties that guarantee freedom of movement.

What may be clearer, though, is that reportedly under the plan, the 3.6 million EU citizens who are already in Britain and others who arrive before the cut-off date would have their rights protected- but only on the condition that the EU would reciprocate the policy for U.K. citizens living in the EU on the other hand.

A Eurosceptic Conservative MP, Iain Duncan Smith, appears to be praising the game plan of May and her fortitude. He said that May understands that if one wants to take control, then one has to command the high ground. Smith shared that May is establishing clarity by setting a clear deadline in stark contrast to the EU which looks more muddled and mean-spirited.

The EU for its part has been arguing that the cut-off date should be the same date as the day the U.K. actually leaves the EU.

A government source shared with The Telegraph that the European Commission might exert the pressure on the U.K. to protect everyone "who arrives to the moment of departure", but doing so might result to half of Romania and Bulgaria rushing to the U.K. to beat the deadline.

On the other end, there are about 1.2 million British citizens who are living in other EU nations. It is being proposed that they should be offered EU citizenship individually.

Amidst some uncertainties surrounding details of the reported plan of May to set a near cut off date for "welcoming" other nationals from coming into the U.K. with prospects of staying for long or permanently, one thing is sure: Brexit is here and will be executed no matter the costs for a bigger, personal goal for the U.K.- its own continued progress and security.

Source :

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-theresa-may-eu-citizens-live-in-uk-freedom-of-movement-european-union-a7601051.html?cmpid=facebook-post

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Vicky No. 1535 1488358607

Could anybody please explain to those people that:

1. "Half Romania and Bulgaria" did NOT flow to the UK for the last decide (since they joined the EU) or even since 2014 when the work restrictions were removed, so it's highly unlikely that they will now. The few seasonal workers who seem to come rushing now before the door slams have no intention to stay and live in the UK permaneny, so they're not threatening the "border control" on the island, if that's what's bothering Mrs May so much.

2. Contrary to what someone might think, NO, Eastern European are NOT that desperate to emigrate. If you think most or even "Half" of us are willing (or even begging) to be put in a box and shipped from Greece to America for example, well people, you're totally wrong. And,

3. I hate to put it to you in such a blunt way but, no guys, your country is NOT the heaven on earth you want everyone to be led to believe. I came to the UK not because I was desperate, I've never been, but because I love the country and it's people, but with the soaring high rates of xenophobia and haterid that's been getting worse by the day since the referendum that might soon change. In any case things will change soon and not for the better.

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