By Kyle James   |  12-31-2017   News
Photo credit: @MerriamWebster | Twitter

The internetspeak for dogs is "Doggos" and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary says the world has spread across social media so much that they are considering the word change.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Doggos. <a href="https://t.co/G2n32twS4X">https://t.co/G2n32twS4X</a></p>&mdash; Merriam-Webster (@MerriamWebster) <a href="https://twitter.com/MerriamWebster/status/946072318723452933?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 27, 2017</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

The term originated on Twitter as an affectionate term for dogs and the site is awash with pictures of people's "doggos." The widespread term refers to "adorable, photogenic dogs looking pensive, jubilant and just plain cute."

Doggos has now spread so far across all social media platforms and around the world that Merriam-Webster editors said on its website that its editors deemed "doggo" a "Word We're Watching" in 2018.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Maybe is a v good doggo. <a href="https://t.co/w9soHrt59I">pic.twitter.com/w9soHrt59I</a></p>&mdash; Josie Richardson (@maybejosie_) <a href="https://twitter.com/maybejosie_/status/946089045498712064?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 27, 2017</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">This Doggo Approves Of Your Tweet. <a href="https://t.co/80bsdY94ze">pic.twitter.com/80bsdY94ze</a></p>&mdash; The Other Sarah Marshall (@cathjenkin) <a href="https://twitter.com/cathjenkin/status/946079043245559808?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 27, 2017</a></blockquote>

<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Twitter responded enthusiastically to the news and tweeted out pictures of their own adorable "doggos." Merriam-Webster also pointed out the word "doggo" originated not online, but in 19th-century slang that meant hide or to fly under the radar like a dozing dog.

Later on, in the 20th Century, the word became synonymous with the word dog and the term has exploded lately. The dictionary site credits the popular Twitter account WeRateDogs with the terms rise to popularity.

<i>On Twitter:</i>

<a href="https://twitter.com/ErvinProduction">@ErvinProduction</a>

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Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/words-were-watching-doggo

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1 Comment/s


H. Berg No. 15130 1514941454

Fucking kill these people and their bastardization of language.

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