By Red Pill  |  11-06-2017   News
Photo credit: BBC

Now if you read that title, that Facebook wants you to upload your nudes so that they (Facebook) can stop revenge porn you're probably thinking that was some type of clickbait.

Unfortunately, it's the truth.

Facebook has increasingly had to deal with users such as vindictive ex-boyfriends and ex-girlfriends who post their former lover's nudes in order to get back at them either through embarrassment or to brag about their conquest or whatever reasoning.

It's become such a problem for Facebook that they're dealing with thousands of requests daily from “victims” who say their exes are posting old nudes of them on the social media behemoth’s website.

Facebook has for years led the industry with cutting edge tech behind it via their research and development team (despite Facebook keeping the same boring user interface for going on two decades) in which some of their experimentations are often used by other developers to evolve technology.

Facebook has state of the art photo recognition software, much of which it has recently implemented into it's security features requiring an image of your face or photo ID to even access your account.

Now they're planning to use that tech in order to stop the onslaught of revenge porn.

How? As the title says, upload your nudes to Facebook.

You're probably wondering why in the hell Facebook would ask for your nudes?

Their logic is that if you upload the images to them (securely and discreetly) that they can identify the image hash, and ensure that those images cannot be uploaded by anyone else ever again.

So say you're a slut who's given out nudes to multiple exes, a common occurrence amongst whores.

Don't worry, Facebook has you covered thots!

Just upload the nudes to Facebook and their artificial intelligence will ensure that those men you slept around with cannot use the images you sent them against you.

Yep, you can be promiscuous just like your mothers were before technology, simply by denying that it ever happened because the man you played cannot share the proof.

A similar tactic is already used however by law enforcement agencies in combating child pornography, by matching the image hash from users against those known images in which the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) have already given to Facebook to ensure that they're not ever used again on the platform.

Most people are unaware that since the year 2008, the NCMEC has given most all tech and social media platforms their list of hash values for commonly known child porn imagery,mlsr of which are provided by Internet Service Providers to the NCMEC which they've collected throughout the years from pedophiles and Child Porn cases across the globe.

In doing so they can then match those images without those companies themselves having to keep digital copies of the offending images, or forcing them to access users’ messages to obtain them.

The hash in itself helps to identify the images and quite frankly reduces the effort required to find the images and prevent them from being posted just by matching the hash.

<a href="https://securityboulevard.com/2017/11/facebook-upload-your-nudes-to-stop-revenge-porn/">Security Boulevard </a>reports that hash originally used to create unique file identifiers was MD5, but Microsoft at one point donated its own PhotoDNA technology to the effort.

PhotoDNA creates a unique signature for an image by converting it to black and white, resizing it, and breaking it into a grid. In each grid cell, the technology finds a histogram of intensity gradients or edges from which it derives its so-called DNA. Images with similar DNA can then be matched.

Given that the amount of data in the DNA is small, large data sets can be scanned quickly, enabling companies including Microsoft, Google, Verizon, Twitter, Facebook and Yahoo to find needles in haystacks and sniff out illegal child abuse imagery. It works even if the images have been resized or cropped.

Now I know what you're thinking, and that's probably asking a few questions about Facebook storing those images.

Does that mean Facebook keeps your nudes in their servers?

Technically, yes.

That also brings up an interesting similar point about the Child Pornography images as well, but the logic behind that actually seems like a good idea as per the NCMEC doing so in the sense that it prevents pedophiles from posting their crap over Facebook.

That being said ladies and gentleman, you could simply avoid these problems altogether by not giving out nudes to people to begin with, but hey that would require serious commitment to avoid degeneracy entirely.

Regardless, if you don't mind sharing your nudes to Facebook, this should prevent Revenge Porn.

—<i>redpill@thegoldwater.com</i>

<i>On Twitter:</i>

<a href="https://www.twitter.com/IWillRedPillYou">@IWillRedPillYou</a>

Tips? Info? Send me a message!

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